Archive | Inspiration

Inside Tate Modern

This group of people handily formed their meeting circle just a moment before I took this snap. A little bit of softness against the hard edges of the Turbine Hall.

 

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March 5, 2014 in Inspiration

Nanna Ditzel

We’ve been researching dining tables for a current womenswear space that will be opening shortly and thought it might be nice to highlight just one of the inspiring designers whose work we were looking at: Nanna Ditzel.

 

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Nanna Ditzel (1923-2005) initially trained as a cabinet maker and graduated from the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Copenhagen in 1946. She established her studio with Jørgen Ditzel and spent a period of her later working life in London where she helped to found the international furniture house, Interspace. Read more about her life and work here.

A prolific furniture designer who produced pieces that she might use in everyday life – such as the high chair and the nursing chair – Ditzel experimented with different production techniques and materials such as bamboo and cane. Alongside furniture, she also designed ceramics, textiles and jewellery, most notably for the Danish brand Georg Jensen. Here are just a few images of her wonderful work:

 

ND 'Toadstool'

Ditzel Chair

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Photo Credits:
Cult View
1st Dibs
Deconet
Jacksons
Covet Garden

 

January 21, 2014 in Inspiration, Sunspel

Inspiration

Henry Cole, the V&A‘s first director, described the museum as ‘a schoolroom for everyone’. Its founding principle was to ‘make works of art available to all, to educate working people and to inspire British designers and manufacturers’. Amongst the almost sixty thousand objects on display are some by the always inspiring nineteenth century designer Christopher Dresser who had studied at the Government School of Design (later to become the Royal College of Art) and who became known as one of the first independent industrial designers. Read more about Christopher Dresser here.

The illustration below (c.1855) shows how Dresser deconstructed botanical forms. He applied what he discovered in these pared down elements to his own design, as seen in his Toast Rack (1881) on the right.

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November 26, 2013 in Inspiration